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Metal Matters SLM Printer - Discussion
#31
(08-26-2021, 03:10 AM)Junkers Wrote: I think the easiest path to follow for the complete removal of oxygen is to vacuum down the chamber. With that said I don't think you actually need to go that far, at least for SS316.

I know that those sintering furnaces for metal-binder printers use an argon-hydrogen mix, 2.9% hydrogen. Not sure how safe it'd be in this application, but I think may work.
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#32
(03-02-2022, 04:36 AM)tedlasman Wrote:
(08-26-2021, 03:10 AM)Junkers Wrote: I think the easiest path to follow for the complete removal of oxygen is to vacuum down the chamber. With that said I don't think you actually need to go that far, at least for SS316.

I know that those sintering furnaces for metal-binder printers use an argon-hydrogen mix, 2.9% hydrogen. Not sure how safe it'd be in this application, but I think may work.

Welcome to the forum tedlasman.

I have heard of hydrogen being used in welding to help increase the level of heat but never in this context. I'm not sure how comfortable I would be testing that theory out.
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#33
Hello, new user here, and a student of mechanical engineering in the UK. Particularly why this is of interest to me, I absolutely love machining and have owned an FDM 3D printer for several years now. 
Absolutely loving the project, hope it's been coming along alright since your latest video. Anyways, I had a suggestion that might make a difference (since you mentioned digitally controlling the current). If you changed the current, and therefore laser power, depending on the velocity (to account for acceleration) and maybe proximity to previous passes (maybe a fading tracer line that the current coordinates compare to with some simple vector calculations and weighting). This is just an idea based on the principle of it all, never tested it, so wouldn't know if it works, but a similar thing is done in modern FDM slicers where less filament is extruded at corners due to acceleration. But maybe a stepper or servo controlled focus ring might be more suitable? I'd love to hear your thoughts on the idea. ?
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#34
Hi Elliott,

Some bad news. I've since moved on from the powder based printer. Based on some feedback I received, I came to the conclusion that I would need to build the printer from scratch (mainly to accommodate a pressurized environment). I've become less and less enthusiastic about the handling of metal powders, let alone the prospect of many others doing so, and have decided to revisit the concept of wire as a feedstock. I haven't posted a video in a while as I want to have something semi running before doing so, but ran into some issues with a logistics provider which set things back by a couple of months. I am still working on things despite my absence.

Regarding your suggestion, Marlin already has a feature which does as you describe. You can read about it here: https://marlinfw.org/docs/configuration/...indle.html

[Image: 20220611-002400.jpg]
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#35
Junkers, have you given any thoughts to going with an electron beam setup? That's what I thought about if I ever attempt to build a metal printer. no need for gas and could be cheaper for the energy source since you don't need a high power fiber laser and galvo...I've looked at some of Ben's videos from applied science to see how to go about steering an E beam for scanning but electronics are not my strong suit. I know it's easier said than done obviously but it might be a route to consider
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